Correlation between urinary albumin to creatinine ratio and systemic glycocalyx degradation in pediatric sepsis

Medical Journal of Indonesia

View Publication Info
 
 
Field Value
 
Title Correlation between urinary albumin to creatinine ratio and systemic glycocalyx degradation in pediatric sepsis
 
Creator Saragih, Rina A.C.; Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Sumatera Utara, Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan
Pudjiadi, Antonius H.; Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta
Tambunan, Taralan; Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta
Satari, Hindra I.; Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta
Aulia, Diana; Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta
Bardosono, Saptawati; Department of Clinical Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta
Munasir, Zakiudin; Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta
Lubis, Munar; Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Sumatera Utara, Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan
 
Subject glycocalyx degradation; sepsis; syndecan-1; urinary albumin: creatinine ratio
 
Description Background: Increased capillary permeability in sepsis is associated with several complications and worse outcomes. Glycocalyx degradation, marked by increased serum syndecan-1 levels, alters vascular permeability, which can manifest as albuminuria in the glomerulus. Therefore, elevated urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) potentially provides an index of systemic glycocalyx degradation. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between urinary ACR and serum syndecan-1 levels.Methods: A longitudinal prospective study with repeated cross-sectional design was conducted on children with sepsis in pediatric intensive care unit, we evaluated serum syndecan-1 levels and urinary ACR on days 1, 2, 3, and 7. A descriptive study on healthy children was also conducted to determine the reference value of syndecan-1 in children.Results: 49 subjects with sepsis were recruited. Based on the data of the healthy children group (n=30), syndecan-1 level of >90th percentile (41.42 ng/mL) was defined as systemic glycocalyx degradation. The correlation coefficients (r) between urinary ACR and syndecan-1 levels were 0.32 (p<0.001) from all examination days (162 specimens), 0.298 (p=0.038) on day 1, and 0.469 (p=0.002) on day 3. The area under the curve of urinary ACR and systemic glycocalyx degradation was 65.7% (95% CI 54.5%–77%; p=0.012). Urinary ACR ≥157.5 mg/g was determined as the cut-off point for glycocalyx degradation, with a sensitivity of 77.4% and a specificity of 48%.Conclusion: Urinary ACR showed a weak correlation with systemic glycocalyx degradation, indicating that the pathophysiology of elevated urinary ACR in sepsis is not merely related to glycocalyx degradation.
 
Publisher Faculty of Medicine Universitas Indonesia
 
Contributor
 
Date 2018-10-12
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier http://mji.ui.ac.id/journal/index.php/mji/article/view/2156
10.13181/mji.v27i3.2156
 
Source Medical Journal of Indonesia; Vol 27, No 3 (2018): September; 194-200
2252-8083
0853-1773
10.13181/mji.v27i3
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://mji.ui.ac.id/journal/index.php/mji/article/view/2156/1247
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2018 Rina A.C. Saragih, Antonius H. Pudjiadi, Taralan Tambunan, Hindra I. Satari, Diana Aulia, Saptawati Bardosono, Zakiudin Munasir, Munar Lubis
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
 

Contact Us

The PKP Index is an initiative of the Public Knowledge Project.

For PKP Publishing Services please use the PKP|PS contact form.

For support with PKP software we encourage users to consult our wiki for documentation and search our support forums.

For any other correspondence feel free to contact us using the PKP contact form.

Find Us

Twitter

Copyright © 2015-2018 Simon Fraser University Library