Femininities and masculinities in highly skilled migration: Peruvian graduates narratives of employment transitions and binational marriages in Switzerland

Migration Letters

View Publication Info
 
 
Field Value
 
Title Femininities and masculinities in highly skilled migration: Peruvian graduates narratives of employment transitions and binational marriages in Switzerland
 
Creator Seminario, Romina
 
Subject Sociology
Highly skilled migration; binational marriages; gender norms; Switzerland; Peru
 
Description Biographic research about migrants gender identities grasps tendencies of normativity change chronologically and transnationally. Transition to employment stories of Peruvian graduates from Swiss universities evoke continuities and changes in femininities and masculinities from Peru to Switzerland. Binational marriages that mediate employment transition after graduation play an ambivalent role in the attainment of jobs commensurate to skills. Career, partner, and care are key elements of transgressing and reinforcing non/hegemonic masculinities and un/desirable femininities from super scientist women to failing male breadwinners. Feminization of highly skilled migration from Peru is linked to urban middle classes where femininities are increasingly based on career advancement. However, these professional-oriented femininities might be neutralized in favour of care-oriented femininities from family models in Switzerland. WhilePeruvian female graduates constructed an ideal of care/career integration predominantly,male counterparts emphasized the risk of career success at the expense of partnership.
 
Publisher Transnational Press London
 
Contributor
 
Date 2018-01-01
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

Research Paper
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://journal.tplondon.com/index.php/ml/article/view/944
 
Source Migration Letters; Vol 15, No 1 (2018): SI: When Expatriation is a Matter of Family. Opportunities, Barriers and Intimacies in Expatriates Mobility; 85-98
1741-8992
1741-8984
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://journal.tplondon.com/index.php/ml/article/view/944/658
 

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