Etnotopografia Nowego Sadu – o dziedzictwie narodów osiedlających się w Nowym Sadzie

Balcanica Posnaniensia

View Publication Info
 
 
Field Value
 
Title Etnotopografia Nowego Sadu – o dziedzictwie narodów osiedlających się w Nowym Sadzie
Ethnic topography of Novi Sad. The heritage of nations inhabiting the city
 
Creator Kwoka, Tomasz
 
Subject Nowy Sad; Wojwodina; Serbia; mniejszości narodowe; kolonizacje; migracje / Novi Sad, Vojvodina, Serbia, national minorities, colonisations, migrations
Novi Sad, Vojvodina, Serbia, national minorities, colonisations, migrations
 
Description The article is an attempt to catalogue the most interesting traces of the presence of nations which were part of the Novi Sad community throughout the ages. From the very beginning of its existence, Novi Sad was a meeting place for different ethnic and cultural groups settling down in the city. Serbs from the surrounding countryside moved to the oldest districts of Novi Sad, Podbara, Salajka, and Rotkvarija, at the beginning of the 18th century. At the same period nations from different parts of the Habsburg Empire, such as Germans, Hungarians, Slovaks and Ruthenians brought by Habsburgs to colonize Vojvodina, moved to the city. It was the time of continuous development of Novi Sad, which became an important trading and manufacturing centre, where businesses were also run by the Jews, Armenians, Aromanians (Tzintzars), and the Greeks. The turn of the 19th and 20th centuries was marked by the strengthening of presence of the Hungarian community, which ended with the First World War. After the establishment of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (1918), the ethnic structure changed seriously with the influx of Serbs from the southern regions of the country. This trend was followed after the Second World War and most recently during the period of the so-called Yugoslav wars at the Nineties. In the meantime, under dramatic circumstances of the second World War, German and Jewish inhabitants vanished from the city.
The article is an attempt to catalogue the most interesting traces of the presence of nations which were part of the Novi Sad community throughout the ages. From the very beginning of its existence, Novi Sad was a meeting place for different ethnic and cultural groups settling down in the city. Serbs from the surrounding countryside moved to the oldest districts of Novi Sad, Podbara, Salajka, and Rotkvarija, at the beginning of the 18th century. At the same period nations from different parts of the Habsburg Empire, such as Germans, Hungarians, Slovaks and Ruthenians brought by Habsburgs to colonize Vojvodina, moved to the city. It was the time of continuous development of Novi Sad, which became an important trading and manufacturing centre, where businesses were also run by the Jews, Armenians, Aromanians (Tzintzars), and the Greeks. The turn of the 19th and 20th centuries was marked by the strengthening of presence of the Hungarian community, which ended with the First World War. After the establishment of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (1918), the ethnic structure changed seriously with the influx of Serbs from the southern regions of the country. This trend was followed after the Second World War and most recently during the period of the so-called Yugoslav wars at the Nineties. In the meantime, under dramatic circumstances of the second World War, German and Jewish inhabitants vanished from the city.
 
Publisher Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza w Poznaniu
 
Contributor

 
Date 2018-02-20
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

Artykuł naukowy
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier http://pressto.amu.edu.pl/index.php/bp/article/view/9929
10.14746/bp.2017.24.8
 
Source Balcanica Posnaniensia Acta et studia; Vol 24 (2017); 127-142
Balcanica Posnaniensia. Acta et studia; Vol 24 (2017); 127-142
2450-3177
0239-4278
 
Language pol
 
Relation http://pressto.amu.edu.pl/index.php/bp/article/view/9929/12129
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2018 Tomasz Kwoka
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0
 

Contact Us

The PKP Index is an initiative of the Public Knowledge Project.

For PKP Publishing Services please use the PKP|PS contact form.

For support with PKP software we encourage users to consult our wiki for documentation and search our support forums.

For any other correspondence feel free to contact us using the PKP contact form.

Find Us

Twitter

Copyright © 2015-2018 Simon Fraser University Library