Effect of Batissa violacea celebensis Martens, 1897, Extract on β-Catenin Gene in Mice (Mus musculus) Induced by Azoxymethane and Dextran Sulfate Sodium using Polymerase Chain Reaction-restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Method

Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences

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Title Effect of Batissa violacea celebensis Martens, 1897, Extract on β-Catenin Gene in Mice (Mus musculus) Induced by Azoxymethane and Dextran Sulfate Sodium using Polymerase Chain Reaction-restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Method
 
Creator Rasyid, Sri Anggarini
Sanatang, Sanatang
Syarif, Satriani
Sugireng, Sugireng
Purnama, Titi
Suwarny, Suwarny
Saputra, Yayan Kurniansyah
 
Subject β-catenin gene
Colorectal cancer
Mutation
Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism
 
Description BACKGROUND: At present, the β-catenin gene is a genetic change considered as the most important factor in the initiation and the progress of cancer. Bivalve extract contains steroid compounds that are thought to have an aphrodisiac and anti-inflammatory effect. The triterpenoid component detected in the crude bivalves extract is thought to have antitumor activity.


AIM: This study aimed at knowing the effect of ethanol (EtOH) extract, ethyl acetate fraction, and the n-hexane fraction of pokea clam on β-catenin gene mutation in mice induced by azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method.


METHODS: The testing of the effect of pokea clam extract was conducted on several treatment groups, namely, AOM/DSSinfected mice treated with EtOH extract, ethyl acetate fraction, and N-hexane fraction. The positive control and the negative control of the three treatment groups were done by giving the extract with a dosage of 0.25 mg/bb to mice for 14 days.


RESULTS: Based on the result of β-catenin gene amplification using the PCR method and RFLP analysis, the EtOH extract and ethyl acetate fraction groups had the same band, namely, 56 bp and 12 bp, consecutively; meanwhile, the n-hexane fraction was marked by the band formation of 191 bp, 82 bp and 48 bp, 69 bp, 116 bp, 151 bp, 180 bp, and 234 bp. From the types of band and the band size that have been formed, it shows that they have the same formation and similarities in the positive and negative treatment characterized by the amplification that occurred in the band size of 227 bp, and the result of amplification from RFLP analysis showed the same band with the same band size, namely, 89 and 138 bp.

CONCLUSION: Based on this, it can be concluded that N-hexane fraction affects β-catenin gene mutation at the first or second base at codon position 32 or 33, and the third base, namely, the bands of 82 and 145 bp that also characterize the effect of N-hexane on β-catenin gene mutation at the second or third base. It is supported by the sequencing method obtaining the homological percentage of 99.13%.
 
Publisher Scientific Foundation SPIROSKI, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia
 
Date 2021-09-24
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://oamjms.eu/index.php/mjms/article/view/6987
10.3889/oamjms.2021.6987
 
Source Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences; Vol. 9 No. A (2021): A - Basic Sciences; 964-970
1857-9655
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://oamjms.eu/index.php/mjms/article/view/6987/6352
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2021 Sri Anggarini Rasyid, Sanatang Sanatang, Satriani Syarif, Sugireng Sugireng, Titi Purnama, Suwarny Suwarny, Yayan Kurniansyah Saputra (Author)
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
 

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