Political Allegory in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver's Travels

Smart Moves Journal IJELLH

View Publication Info
 
 
Field Value
 
Title Political Allegory in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver's Travels
 
Creator Chauta, Gopal
 
Description Gulliver's Travels is written by Seventeenth century Anglo-Irish prose writer Jonathan Swift. Jonathan swift employed literary device called invective, satire in his writing to cure social malaise of seventeenth century society. Gulliver's travels are a political allegory in which seventeenth century society is highlighted in many aspects. There is a character called Lemuel Gulliver which is enterprising and adventurous underwent a voyage to Lilliput. The author gives some account of himself and family. His first inducement to travel. He is shipwrecked and swims for his life gets safe on shore in the country of Lilliput is made prisoner and carried up the country. The emperor of Lilliput attended by several of the nobility, come to see the author in his confinement. The Emperor's person and habit described. Learned men appointed to teach the author the language. He gains favor by his mild disposition. His pockets are searched and his sword & pistols taken from him.
 
Publisher Smart Moves
 
Date 2021-04-28
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://ijellh.com/OJS/index.php/OJS/article/view/10988
10.24113/ijellh.v9i4.10988
 
Source SMART MOVES JOURNAL IJELLH ; Vol. 9 No. 4 (2021): Volume 9, Issue 4, April 2021; 111-118
2582-3574
2582-4406
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://ijellh.com/OJS/index.php/OJS/article/view/10988/9126
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2021 Gopal Chauta
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
 

Contact Us

The PKP Index is an initiative of the Public Knowledge Project.

For PKP Publishing Services please use the PKP|PS contact form.

For support with PKP software we encourage users to consult our wiki for documentation and search our support forums.

For any other correspondence feel free to contact us using the PKP contact form.

Find Us

Twitter

Copyright © 2015-2018 Simon Fraser University Library