The language of American political discourse: Aristotle's rhetorical appeals as manifested in Bush's and Obama's speeches on the war on terror

International Journal of Linguistics, Literature and Culture

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Field Value
 
Title The language of American political discourse: Aristotle's rhetorical appeals as manifested in Bush's and Obama's speeches on the war on terror
 
Creator Raissouni, Iman
 
Subject Aristotle
critical discourse analysis
persuasion
political discourse
rhetoric
 
Description This article employs critical discourse analysis to analyze the representation of the “war on terror” in the political speeches of Presidents George Bush and Barack Obama in the decade following 9/11; it examines Aristotle's approach into the study of the language of persuasion through his three main rhetorical appeals: ethos, pathos, and logos, identifying several strands of the war on terror discourse and analyzing the way they influence the persuasiveness of the speeches and therefore the ability to generate public debate. The findings show substantial similarities in representation patterns among the two presidents' discourses and end up to the conclusion that the language of the war on terror is not simply a neutral or objective reflection of policy debates of terrorism and counterterrorism; rather, it is a carefully and deliberately constructed public discourse designed to make the war on terror look reasonable and morally justified.
 
Publisher Scientific and Literature Open Access Publishing
 
Date 2020-05-11
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier http://sloap.org/journals/index.php/ijllc/article/view/904
10.21744/ijllc.v6n4.904
 
Source International journal of linguistics, literature and culture; Vol. 6 No. 4 (2020): Special Issue in International Association for Technology, Education and Language Studies (IATELS); 38-48
2455-8028
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://sloap.org/journals/index.php/ijllc/article/view/904/1431
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2020 International journal of linguistics, literature and culture
 

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