Alzheimer’s Disease & Dementia-From Pathophysiology To Clinic

International Journal of Aging Research

View Publication Info
 
 
Field Value
 
Title Alzheimer’s Disease & Dementia-From Pathophysiology To Clinic
 
Creator Paulo Roberto de Brito Marques
 
Subject Alzheimer’s Disease,Dementia, Pathophysiology, Clinic
 
Description Dementia is a syndrome that occurs due to the difficulty of a patient in doing his cognitive and instrumental activities of daily life with the same performance as before, bringing him losses. This syndrome is caused by numerous primary and secondary etiologies. The most common primary cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which reaches almost 50% of dementia cases. The DA it consists of biological fragments of the amyloid precursor protein that are deposited in the brain 10 years or more, before the first symptoms appear. The period before the onset of symptoms is called the preclinical stage. The transition between the silence of symptoms and their appearance, usually due to memory loss for recent events, is known as the prodromal phase. Continuing the pathophysiological process, the stage of mild dementia takes place, when the patient has one more cognitive component associated with memory loss; follows the moderate, severe, profound and terminal phase of dementia.
 
Publisher eSciPub LLC
 
Date 2020-09-26
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://escipub.org/index.php/IJOAR/article/view/157
10.28933/ijoar-2020-08-1005
 
Source International Journal of Aging Research; Vol. 3 No. 4 (2020): International Journal of Aging Research; 70
2637-3742
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://escipub.org/index.php/IJOAR/article/view/157/158
 

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