SUBJUGATION TO LIBERATION: IN TASLIMA NASRIN’S NOVEL SHODH

Smart Moves Journal IJELLH

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Field Value
 
Title SUBJUGATION TO LIBERATION: IN TASLIMA NASRIN’S NOVEL SHODH
 
Creator Yadav, Rahul
 
Description Taslima Nasrin is a secular humanist writer who fights for the freedom, equality and rights of women in her works. Woman is considered as ‘other’, less human being and ‘object’ in male dominated society. They are suppressed, oppressed and limited to the four walls of the house. Thus provided subjugated position in the patriarchal society. Nasrin’s novel Shodh truly, emphasize on subjugation to liberation where Jhumur, the protagonist, liberates herself in her own unique way. In the novel Shodh, the protagonist is restrained to family and ‘womb’. This novel revolves around, restricting her status to an ‘incomplete’ individual, one who defined ‘with reference to man’. The protagonist further uprooted patriarchal norms by rebel and liberated to get her own status in society. Shodh is all about revenge (getting even), and then upliftment of woman. In the end of the novel, Jhumur got freedom and free herself from the shackles of the society. Now she has liberated herself by getting social and economical equality and stability.
 
Publisher Smart Moves
 
Date 2021-07-03
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://ijellh.com/OJS/index.php/OJS/article/view/3977
 
Source SMART MOVES JOURNAL IJELLH ; Volume 6, Issue 6, June 2018; 13
2582-3574
2582-4406
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://ijellh.com/OJS/index.php/OJS/article/view/3977/3554
 
Rights https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
 

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