The Relationship Between Perception and Social Conflict in Society: Islam Hadhari in Malaysia

Asian Social Work Journal (ASWJ)

View Publication Info
 
 
Field Value
 
Title The Relationship Between Perception and Social Conflict in Society: Islam Hadhari in Malaysia
 
Creator Yusna, Darni
Fahmi, Reza
Aswirna, Prima
 
Description The research objectives: (1) Explain the history of the development of Islam in Malaysia. (2) Explain the picture of the spread of the standard positive perception of religious leaders and community members about Islam Hadhari. (3) Connecting between positive opinions of religious leaders and community members and their relation to social conflicts in Malaysia. The study used a quantitative approach. The population in this study was 200 people, of which 38 were religious leaders, and 152 were members of the community. The data collection technique was using a psychological scale. Data analysis technique using Pearson correlation. The results of this study found that generally, the positive perceptions of religious leaders and community members about Islam Nusantara and Islam Hadhari were classified as high while the social conflict during society is classified as low.
 
Publisher Asian Social Work Journal
 
Date 2020-07-28
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
Peer-reviewed Article
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://msocialwork.com/index.php/aswj/article/view/141
10.47405/aswj.v5i2.141
 
Source Asian Social Work Journal; Vol 5 No 2 (2020); 44 - 48
0128-1577
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://msocialwork.com/index.php/aswj/article/view/141/91
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2020 Asian Social Work Journal
 

Contact Us

The PKP Index is an initiative of the Public Knowledge Project.

For PKP Publishing Services please use the PKP|PS contact form.

For support with PKP software we encourage users to consult our wiki for documentation and search our support forums.

For any other correspondence feel free to contact us using the PKP contact form.

Find Us

Twitter

Copyright © 2015-2018 Simon Fraser University Library