What Can Danish Multicultural Children’s Literature and African American Children’s Literature Learn from Each Other? : Literary Histories in Dialogue

Barnboken

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Field Value
 
Title What Can Danish Multicultural Children’s Literature and African American Children’s Literature Learn from Each Other? : Literary Histories in Dialogue
 
Creator Mansour, Nadia
Martin, Michelle H.
 
Subject categorizing literature
Denmark
United States
literary definition
pedagogical definition
insiders vs. outsiders
silenced minorities
authenticity
 
Description In its pedagogical context, multicultural literature is defined as an instrument for multicultural education that seeks to include and raise the voices of historically silenced and invisible minorities in the school curriculum.The contemporary American definition of multicultural literature emphasizes #OwnVoices and elevates authentic stories from insider perspectives, while in Denmark, no clear line is drawn between the author’s background and the literary content when categorizing multicultural literature that depicts minorities’ experiences. In this article, an African American scholar and a Danish scholar will put Danish and African American children’s literary histories in dialogue with one another and ask what Danish multicultural literature can learn from existing definitions within American multicultural and African American children’s literature, formulated by Rudine Sims Bishop, Mingshui Cai, and Michelle H. Martin. They will also address what literary movements and practices might be adapted to facilitate a more welcoming space for minority stories in Danish literature. In the United States, lively conversations are occurring about insiders vs. outsiders, #OwnVoices, and stereotypes; what are the implications for Danish children’s literature? The writers will analyze recently published works from each country that depicts the lives of minoritized people such as Özlem Cekic and Dorte Karrebæk’s Ayse får en lillebror (2018) and Derrick Barnes and Gordon C. James’s Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut (2017). This comparative analysis will highlight how marginalized and silenced voices bring new perspectives and fresh ideas into the cultural conversations of each country that would otherwise go unrepresented in children’s literature.  
 
Publisher Svenska Barnboksinstitutet
 
Date 2020-06-16
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
application/epub+zip
text/xml
text/html
 
Identifier http://barnboken.net/index.php/clr/article/view/503
10.14811/clr.v43i0.503
 
Source Barnboken; Volume 43 (2020)
0347-772X
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://barnboken.net/index.php/clr/article/view/503/1571
http://barnboken.net/index.php/clr/article/view/503/1657
http://barnboken.net/index.php/clr/article/view/503/1659
http://barnboken.net/index.php/clr/article/view/503/1661
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2020 Barnboken – Journal of Children's Literature Research
 

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