The effect of polydextrose and probiotic lactobacilli in a Clostridium difficile-infected human colonic model

Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease

View Publication Info
 
 
Field Value
 
Title The effect of polydextrose and probiotic lactobacilli in a Clostridium difficile-infected human colonic model
 
Creator Forssten, Sofia D.; Danisco Sweeteners Oy Active Nutrition
Röytiö, Henna; University of Turku, Functional Foods Forum, Turku
Hibberd, Ashley A.; DuPont Health and Nutrition, Saint Louis, MO
Ouwehand, Arthur C.; DuPont Health and Nutrition, Kantvik,
 
Subject Clostridium difficile; pathogenic growth suppression; in vitro model; 16S; qPCR
 
Description Background: Clostridium difficile is a natural resident of the intestinal microbiota; however, it becomes harmful when the normal intestinal microbiota is disrupted, and overgrowth and toxin production occurs. The toxins can cause bloating and diarrhoea, which may cause severe disease and have the potential to cause outbreaks in hospitals and other healthcare settings. Normally, antibiotic agents are used for treatment, although for some of the patients, these treatments provide only a temporary relief with a recurrence of C. difficile–associated diarrhoea.Objective: The effects of polydextrose (PDX), Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, and L. paracasei Lpc-37 on the growth of C. difficile were investigated in an in vitro model of infected human large intestine.Design: The semi-continuous colonic model is composed of four connected vessels inoculated with human faecal microbes and spiked with pathogenic C. difficile (DSM 1296). PDX in two concentrations (2 and 4%), NCFM, and Lpc-37 were fed to the system during the 2-day simulation, and the growth of C. difficile and several other microbial groups were monitored using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and 16S rDNA sequencing.Results: The microbial community structure of the simulation samples was closely grouped according to treatment, and the largest shifts in the microbial composition were seen with PDX. The microbial diversity decreased significantly with 4% PDX, and the OTU containing C. difficile was significantly (p<0.01) decreased when compared to control and lactobacilli treatments. The mean numbers of C. difficile also decreased as detected by qPCR, although the reduction did not reach statistical significance.Conclusions: The treatments influenced the colonic microbiota, and a trend for reduced numbers of C. difficile as well as alterations of several microbial groups could be detected. This suggests that PDX may be able to modulate the composition and/or function of the colonic microbiota in such manner that it affects the pathogenic C. difficile.Keywords: Clostridium difficile; pathogenic growth suppression; in vitro model; 16S; qPCR(Published: 13 October 2015)Citation: Microbial Ecology in Health & Disease 2015, 26: 27988 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/mehd.v26.27988
 
Publisher Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
 
Contributor
 
Date 2015-10-13
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

 
Format application/pdf
text/html
application/epub+zip
application/xml
 
Identifier http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/27988
10.3402/mehd.v26.27988
 
Source Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease; Vol 26 (2015)
1651-2235
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/27988/42628
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/27988/42629
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/27988/42630
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/27988/42631
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/downloadSuppFile/27988/19870
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2015 Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
 

Contact Us

The PKP Index is an initiative of the Public Knowledge Project.

For PKP Publishing Services please use the PKP|PS contact form.

For support with PKP software we encourage users to consult our wiki for documentation and search our support forums.

For any other correspondence feel free to contact us using the PKP contact form.

Find Us

Twitter

Copyright © 2015-2018 Simon Fraser University Library