Antimicrobial activity of essential oils of cultivated oregano (Origanum vulgare), sage (Salvia officinalis), and thyme (Thymus vulgaris) against clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Klebsiella pneumoniae

Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease

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Title Antimicrobial activity of essential oils of cultivated oregano (Origanum vulgare), sage (Salvia officinalis), and thyme (Thymus vulgaris) against clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Klebsiella pneumoniae
 
Creator Fournomiti, Maria
Kimbaris, Athanasios
Mantzourani, Ioanna
Plessas, Stavros
Theodoridou, Irene
Papaemmanouil, Virginia
Kapsiotis, Ioannis
Panopoulou, Maria
Stavropoulou, Elisavet
Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia E.
Alexopoulos, Athanasios
 
Subject E. coli; Kl. oxytoca; Kl. pneumonia; essential oils; thyme; oregano; sage
 
Description Background: Oregano (Origanum vulgare), sage (Salvia officinalis), and thyme (Thymus vulgaris) are aromatic plants with ornamental, culinary, and phytotherapeutic use all over the world. In Europe, they are traditionally used in the southern countries, particularly in the Mediterranean region. The antimicrobial activities of the essential oils (EOs) derived from those plants have captured the attention of scientists as they could be used as alternatives to the increasing resistance of traditional antibiotics against pathogen infections. Therefore, significant interest in the cultivation of various aromatic and medicinal plants is recorded during the last years. However, to gain a proper and marketable chemotype various factors during the cultivation should be considered as the geographical morphology, climatic, and farming conditions. In this frame, we have studied the antimicrobial efficiency of the EOs from oregano, sage, and thyme cultivated under different conditions in a region of NE Greece in comparison to the data available in literature.Methods: Plants were purchased from a certified supplier, planted, and cultivated in an experimental field under different conditions and harvested after 9 months. EOs were extracted by using a Clevenger apparatus and tested for their antibacterial properties (Minimum inhibitory concentration – MIC) against clinical isolates of multidrug resistant Escherichia coli (n=27), Klebsiella oxytoca (n=7), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=16) strains by using the broth microdilution assay.Results: Our results showed that the most sensitive organism was K. oxytoca with a mean value of MIC of 0.9 µg/mL for oregano EOs and 8.1 µg/mL for thyme. The second most sensitive strain was K. pneumoniae with mean MIC values of 9.5 µg/mL for thyme and 73.5 µg/mL for oregano EOs. E. coli strains were among the most resistant to EOs antimicrobial action as the observed MICs were 24.8–28.6 µg/mL for thyme and above 125 µg/mL for thyme and sage. Most efficient were the EOs from thyme followed by those of oregano.Conclusions: With MIC values above 150 µg/mL, sage EOs did not show any antibacterial efficiency against the majority of the strains. However, no significant differences were observed concerning the antimicrobial action of all EOs originating from irrigated versus non-irrigated cultivated aromatic plants.Keywords: E. coli; K. oxytoca; K. pneumoniae; essential oils; thyme; oregano; sage(Published: 15 April 2015)Citation: Microbial Ecology in Health & Disease 2015, 26: 23289 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/mehd.v26.23289
 
Publisher Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
 
Contributor
 
Date 2015-04-15
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

 
Format application/pdf
text/html
application/epub+zip
application/xml
 
Identifier http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/23289
10.3402/mehd.v26.23289
 
Source Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease; Vol 26 (2015)
1651-2235
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/23289/39623
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/23289/39626
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/23289/39627
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/23289/39628
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/downloadSuppFile/23289/11597
 
Rights http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
 

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