Gut bacteria in children with autism spectrum disorders: challenges and promise of studying how a complex community influences a complex disease

Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease

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Field Value
 
Title Gut bacteria in children with autism spectrum disorders: challenges and promise of studying how a complex community influences a complex disease
 
Creator Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Arizona State University
Lozupone, Catherine; University of Colorado-Denver
Kang, Dae-Wook; Arizona State University
Adams, James B.; Arizona State University
 
Subject Autism; GI problems; Gut microbiome; Gut microflora; Prevotella; Next-generation sequencing; Meta-analysis; Gut-brain interaction
 
Description Recent studies suggest a role for the microbiota in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), potentially arising from their role in modulating the immune system and gastrointestinal (GI) function or from gut–brain interactions dependent or independent from the immune system. GI problems such as chronic constipation and/or diarrhea are common in children with ASD, and significantly worsen their behavior and their quality of life. Here we first summarize previously published data supporting that GI dysfunction is common in individuals with ASD and the role of the microbiota in ASD. Second, by comparing with other publically available microbiome datasets, we provide some evidence that the shifted microbiota can be a result of westernization and that this shift could also be framing an altered immune system. Third, we explore the possibility that gut–brain interactions could also be a direct result of microbially produced metabolites.Keywords: autism; GI problems; gut microbiome; gut microflora; Prevotella; next-generation sequencing; meta-analysis; gut–brain interaction(Published: 12 March 2015)Citation: Microbial Ecology in Health & Disease 2015, 26: 26914 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/mehd.v26.26914
 
Publisher Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
 
Contributor Autism Research Institute, Bhare Foundation, the Emch foundation
 
Date 2015-03-12
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

 
Format application/pdf
application/pdf
text/html
application/epub+zip
application/xml
 
Identifier http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/26914
10.3402/mehd.v26.26914
 
Source Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease; Vol 26 (2015)
1651-2235
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/26914/38942
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/26914/38997
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/26914/38943
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/26914/38944
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/26914/38945
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/downloadSuppFile/26914/18104
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/downloadSuppFile/26914/18105
http://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/downloadSuppFile/26914/19065
 

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