Extended-spectrum beta-lactamaseproducing bacteria in a tertiary care hospital in Madrid: epidemiology, risk factors and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns

Emerging Health Threats Journal

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Title Extended-spectrum beta-lactamaseproducing bacteria in a tertiary care hospital in Madrid: epidemiology, risk factors and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns
 
Creator Rubio-Perez, Ines; Hospital Universitario de La Princesa Madrid, Spain.
Martin-Perez, Elena; Hospital Universitario de La Princesa Madrid, Spain.
Domingo Garcia, Diego; Hospital Universitario de La Princesa Madrid, Spain.
Lopez-Brea Calvo, Manuel; Hospital Universitario de La Princesa Madrid, Spain.
Larrañaga Barrera, Eduardo; Hospital Universitario de La Princesa Madrid, Spain.
 
Subject Epidemiology; Clinical Microbiology, Bacterial infections
extended spectrum beta-lactamases; ESBL; Enterobacteriaceae; institutional epidemiology; nosocomial infection; antimicrobial resistance
RA421-790.95; RA643-645; RC109-216
 
Description Introduction: Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria have been increasingly reported as causal agents of nosocomial infection worldwide. Resistance patterns vary internationally, and even locally, from one institution to the other. We investigated the clinical isolates positive for ESBL-producing bacteria in our institution, a tertiary care hospital in Madrid (Spain), during a 2-year period (20072008). Methods: Clinical and microbiological data were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and nineteen patients were included in the study. Results: Advanced age, diabetes, use of catheters, previous hospitalization and previous antibiotic treatment were some of the risk factors found among patients. Escherichia coli was the most frequent isolate, and urinary tract the most common site of isolation. Internal Medicine, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and General Surgery presented the highest number of isolates. There were no outbreaks during the study period. Antibiotic patterns showed high resistance rates to quinolones in all isolates. There was 100% sensitivity to carbapenems. Conclusion: Carbapenems continue to be the treatment of choice for ESBL-producing bacteria. Infection control measures are of great importance to avoid the spread of these nosocomial infections.Keywords: extended spectrum beta-lactamases; ESBL; Enterobacteriaceae; institutional epidemiology; nosocomial infection; antimicrobial resistance(Published: 18 july 2012)Citation: Emerg Health Threats J 2012, 5: 11589 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/ehtj.v5i0.11589
 
Publisher Emerging Health Threats Journal
 
Contributor
 
Date 2012-07-18
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

Retrospective and descriptive study
 
Format application/pdf
text/html
application/epub+zip
text/xml
 
Identifier http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/ehtj/article/view/11589
10.3402/ehtj.v5i0.11589
 
Source Emerging Health Threats Journal; Vol 5 (2012) incl Supplements
1752-8550
1752-8550
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/ehtj/article/view/11589/23254
http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/ehtj/article/view/11589/23255
http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/ehtj/article/view/11589/23257
http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/ehtj/article/view/11589/23258
 
Coverage Madrid, Spain.
2-year period (2007 and 2008)
hospitalized patients of all departments with ESBL infection
 

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