The Evolution and Expansion of Regional Disease Surveillance Networks and Their Role in Mitigating the Threat of Infectious Disease Outbreaks

Emerging Health Threats Journal

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Title The Evolution and Expansion of Regional Disease Surveillance Networks and Their Role in Mitigating the Threat of Infectious Disease Outbreaks
 
Creator Bond, Katherine C.
Macfarlane, Sarah B.
Burke, Charlanne
Ungchusak, Kumnuan
Wibulpolprasert, Suwit
 
Subject


 
Description We examine the emergence, development, and value of regional infectious disease surveillance networks that neighboring countries worldwide are organizing to control cross-border outbreaks at their source. The regional perspective represented in the paper is intended to serve as an instructive framework for others who decide to launch such networks as new technologies and emerging threats bring countries even closer together. Distinct from more formal networks in geographic regions designated by the World Health Organization (WHO), these networks usually involve groupings of fewer countries chosen by national governments to optimize surveillance efforts. Sometimes referred to as sub-regional, these “self-organizing” networks complement national and local government recognition with informal relationships across borders among epidemiologists, scientists, ministry officials, health workers, border officers, and community members. Their development over time reflects both incremental learning and growing connections among network actors; and changing disease patterns, with infectious disease threats shifting over time from local to regional to global levels. Not only has this regional disease surveillance network model expanded across the globe, it has also expanded from a mostly practitioner-based network model to one that covers training, capacity-building, and multidisciplinary research. Today, several of these networks are linked through Connecting Organizations for Regional Disease Surveillance (CORDS). We explore how regional disease surveillance networks add value to global disease detection and response by complementing other systems and efforts, by harnessing their power to achieve other goals such as health and human security, and by helping countries adapt to complex challenges via multi-sectoral solutions. We note that governmental commitment and trust among participating individuals are critical to the success of regional infectious disease surveillance networks.Keywords: regional networks; disease surveillance; trust; pandemics; cross-border; SARS; International Health Regulations(Published: 25 January 2013)Citation: Emerg Health Threats J 2013, 6: 19913 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/ehtj.v6i0.19913
 
Publisher Emerging Health Threats Journal
 
Contributor
 
Date 2013-01-25
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion


 
Format application/pdf
text/html
application/epub+zip
text/xml
 
Identifier http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/ehtj/article/view/19913
10.3402/ehtj.v6i0.19913
 
Source Emerging Health Threats Journal; Vol 6 (2013) incl Supplements
1752-8550
1752-8550
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/ehtj/article/view/19913/25751
http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/ehtj/article/view/19913/25752
http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/ehtj/article/view/19913/25753
http://journals.co-action.net/index.php/ehtj/article/view/19913/25754
 
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