COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES APPLIED BY HIGH LEVEL OF EFL STUDENTS IN EXTENSIVE SPEAKING CLASS

Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri (e-journal)

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Title COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES APPLIED BY HIGH LEVEL OF EFL STUDENTS IN EXTENSIVE SPEAKING CLASS
COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES APPLIED BY HIGH LEVEL OF EFL STUDENTS IN EXTENSIVE SPEAKING CLASS
 
Creator Khoiriyah, Khoiriyah
 
Description  
Communication is interaction between one person and others through verbal and nonverbal communication. Being able to communicate effectively is the optimal goal of all language learners; therefore, despite difficulties they face and restrictions they have while expressing themselves, they rely on employing diverse communication strategies (CSs). This case study was set to describe the types of communication strategies applied by high level of EFL students in extensive speaking class and to identify types of communication strategies are frequently used  by high level of EFL students in extensive speaking class. Third  grade of English department at Nusantara PGRI Kediri University students of EFL were assigned to participate in the present study. The participants' speaking performances were analyzed qualitatively using Dornyei's (1995) taxonomy of CSs. The results of the study revealed that the context of communication plays a significant role in the use of communication strategies. The high level students applied seven communication strategies out of the twelve types of communication strategies such as: message abandonment, topic avoidance, use of non-linguistic signal, literal translation, code switching, appeal for help, and stalling for time gaining. The most frequently used were time gaining and non-linguistic signal strategies.
 
Communication is interaction between one person and others through verbal and nonverbal communication. Being able to communicate effectively is the optimal goal of all language learners; therefore, despite difficulties they face and restrictions they have while expressing themselves, they rely on employing diverse communication strategies (CSs). This case study was set to describe the types of communication strategies applied by high level of EFL students in extensive speaking class and to identify types of communication strategies are frequently used  by high level of EFL students in extensive speaking class. Third  grade of English department at Nusantara PGRI Kediri University students of EFL were assigned to participate in the present study. The participants' speaking performances were analyzed qualitatively using Dornyei's (1995) taxonomy of CSs. The results of the study revealed that the context of communication plays a significant role in the use of communication strategies. The high level students applied seven communication strategies out of the twelve types of communication strategies such as: message abandonment, topic avoidance, use of non-linguistic signal, literal translation, code switching, appeal for help, and stalling for time gaining. The most frequently used were time gaining and non-linguistic signal strategies.
 
 
Publisher Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri
 
Date 2015-04-10
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://ojs.unpkediri.ac.id/index.php/efektor/article/view/72
 
Source Nusantara of Research : Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri; Vol. 2 No. 1 (2015)
Nusantara of Research : Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri; Vol 2 No 1 (2015)
2355-7249
2579-3063
 
Language ind
 
Relation https://ojs.unpkediri.ac.id/index.php/efektor/article/view/72/29
 

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