Orbital Abscess Drainage Using Intravenous Cannula: Technique and Advantages

Ophthalmology Research: An International Journal

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Field Value
 
Title Orbital Abscess Drainage Using Intravenous Cannula: Technique and Advantages
 
Creator Zerrouk, Rachid
Elkhoyaali, Adil
Akioud, Wafae
Khmamouche, Mehdi
Elasri, Fouad
Reda, Karim
Oubaaz, Abdelbarre
 
Description The orbital infections are known to be the most frequent primitive orbital pathology.
Rhinosinusitis (RS) is the most common cause of orbital inflammation and infection, especially in the pediatric range. So far, the main orbital complication of RS is the preseptal cellulitis. The dissemination of the infection in the orbital retroseptal area may occur and is considered to be a serious complication requiring urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is usually seen as an orbital (OSPA) subperiosteal abscess adjacent to the infected sinus. The diagnosis of an OSPA is based on clinical evaluation as well as X-ray imaging. The CT scan is the preferred imaging modality for orbital abscess diagnosis.  In most cases of OSPA, the surgery is often indicated and can be conducted by an external method, transnasal endoscopy or a combined method.   In this article, we describe the technique of external drainage using an intravenous cannula (case report of 10 patients) as well as the results obtained.
 
Publisher SCIENCEDOMAIN international
 
Date 2019-09-16
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier http://journalor.com/index.php/OR/article/view/30113
10.9734/or/2019/v10i430113
 
Source Ophthalmology Research: An International Journal; 2019 - Volume 10 [Issue 4]; 1-7
2321-7227
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://journalor.com/index.php/OR/article/view/30113/56498
http://journalor.com/index.php/OR/article/view/30113/56499
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2019 © 2019 Zerrouk et al.; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 

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