Language And Gender In Teen Short-Stories

Wanastra: Jurnal Bahasa dan Sastra

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Field Value
 
Title Language And Gender In Teen Short-Stories
 
Creator Indarti, Dwi
 
Description This study aims to investigate the differences of language use between two short-stories published in two teen magazines which represent gender. According to the content, context, and segment readers, HAI magazine is considered as teen male magazine while KAWANKU is considered as teen female magazine. The results of this study confirm the theory of gender in writing production proposed by Coates (1993) who stated that men tend to use a report style aiming to communicate factual information, whereas women more often use a rapport style which is more concerned with building and maintaining relationships.  The two short-stories in HAI and Kawanku reflect the issue of gender construction in society through written discourse. Gendered language that occurs in the literary works such as short-story declare that the differences between male and female way of speak can be found in written texts.
 
Publisher ABA BSI Jakarta
 
Contributor
 
Date 2018-09-23
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier http://ejournal.bsi.ac.id/ejurnal/index.php/wanastra/article/view/4055
10.31294/w.v10i2.4055
 
Source Wanastra; Vol 10, No 2 (2018): September 2018; 85-90
Wanastra: Jurnal Bahasa dan Sastra; Vol 10, No 2 (2018): September 2018; 85-90
2579-3438
2086-6151
10.31294/w.v10i2
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://ejournal.bsi.ac.id/ejurnal/index.php/wanastra/article/view/4055/2645
 
Rights ##submission.copyrightStatement##
 

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