Social Work and Social Sciences Review

Social Work and Social Sciences Review  sets out to reinforce and expand the links between international social work practice and the various social science disciplines which inform it. The Editors welcome articles and proposals from any area in the social sciences,particularly with relevance to the development of social work knowledge. For example, social policy and its relationship with, and impact upon, social work has never been more important. In many countries, particularly in the Western world, recent years have seen a plethora of social policy initiatives introduced, each designed to improve the lives of social work service users at different stages in the life course. In the UK for instance, policy areas include: The New Social Justice Strategy, for example, Troubled Families, Valuing People and Youth Transitions.  However the impact of welfare reform, the austerity crisis and the current disassembling of the welfare state have, many critics claim, sharpened social inequalities and reduced social mobility.  The Journal welcomes in particular articles which draw upon an interdisciplinary field which includes other cognate disciplines; and where there is overlap in explaining social problems, in terms of both empirical foci and methods of analysis. The boundaries between social work and other social science disciplines – for example, health studies, sociology,psychology, economics and public sector management – are porous and shifting;and there are clear historical links between social policy and social work. The bureaucratisation of social work and health care, coupled with extensive partnership arrangements with the private, voluntary and 3rd sectors, has characterised a recent transformation of organisational culture and introduced a range of different professionals and others involved in the delivery of care to any one individual or family. The consequences of recent social policy developments, in particular the cuts in welfare spending, will impact upon the economic and social well-being of vulnerable people, while at the same time constraining the options and resources available to social workers.

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