Efficacy of Probiotic Therapy on Atopic Dermatitis in Adults Depends on the C-159T Polymorphism of the CD14 Receptor Gene - A Pilot Study

Journal of Business & Economics Research (JBER)

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Title Efficacy of Probiotic Therapy on Atopic Dermatitis in Adults Depends on the C-159T Polymorphism of the CD14 Receptor Gene - A Pilot Study
 
Creator Litus, Oleksandr
Derkach, Nadiya
Litus, Viktor
Bisyuk, Yuriy
Lytvynenko, Bohdan
 
Subject atopic dermatitis
Probiotics
C-159T polymorphism
Cytokines
 
Description BACKGROUND: The C-159T polymorphism of the CD14 receptor gene can be associated with the development of atopic dermatitis. Probiotics can modulate chronic inflammation through activation of the CD14 receptor. So, the efficacy of probiotic therapy can be dependent on this genetic polymorphism.
AIM: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of adding probiotic (Lactobacillus acidophilus, LA-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, ВВ-12) to standard treatment (ointment of fluticasone propionate 0.005% and emollient) of atopic dermatitis in adults during 28 days, depending on the stratification of patients on CC or TT genotypes of the CD14 receptor gene.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 37 adult patients with AD. There were identified 19 patients with exogenous (IgE-dependent) and 18 with endogenous (IgE-dependent) AD. To evaluate the efficacy of the probiotics all patients were divided into three groups for both exogenous and endogenous AD. The first group was selected from patients with CC genotype (C-159T) who received standard therapy (ointment of fluticasone propionate 0.005% – 2 times a day, emollients – 2 times a day) and probiotic (Lactobacillus acidophilus, LA-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, ВВ-12 - 1 capsule 2 times per day) The second group included patients with CC genotype, who received only standard therapy. The third group was presented by patients with TT genotype (C-159T) who received standard therapy and probiotic. The SCORAD and DLQI parameters were evaluated on Day 0, 14 and 28. The level of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-β cytokines was determined on Day 0 and Day 28.
RESULTS: The results of our study found that the addition of probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, LA-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, ВВ-12) to standard treatment (ointment of fluticasone propionate 0.005%, emollient) significantly increased the effectiveness of treatment of atopic dermatitis in adults with exogenous form and CC genotype (C-159T), confirmed by clinical (a significant decrease of SCORAD and DLQI indices) and immunological criteria (a significant decrease of IL-4 and an increase of TGF-β).
CONCLUSION: Simultaneous determination of the exogenous or endogenous form, identification of the C-159T genotypes, evaluation of the serum level of IL-4 and TGF-β can serve as an algorithm for the personalised treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis.
 
Publisher Scientific Foundation SPIROSKI, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia; ID Design 2012/DOOEL Skopje, Republic of Macedonia
 
Date 2019-04-10
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
application/pdf
 
Identifier https://www.id-press.eu/mjms/article/view/oamjms.2019.242
10.3889/oamjms.2019.242
 
Source Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences; Vol 7 No 7 (2019): Apr 15 (OAMJMS); 1053-1058
1857-9655
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://www.id-press.eu/mjms/article/view/oamjms.2019.242/3199
https://www.id-press.eu/mjms/article/view/oamjms.2019.242/3164
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2019 Oleksandr Litus, Nadiya Derkach, Viktor Litus, Yuriy Bisyuk, Bohdan Lytvynenko
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
 

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