Arthropod Biodiversity and Abundance in Organically and Conventionally Managed, Cool-climate Vineyards in Orange, New South Wales, Australia

Berita Biologi

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Title Arthropod Biodiversity and Abundance in Organically and Conventionally Managed, Cool-climate Vineyards in Orange, New South Wales, Australia
 
Creator Al Habsi, Saad N.; Charles Sturt University & Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, Orange, NSW, Australia
Sharma, Anamika; Charles Sturt University & Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, Orange, NSW, Australia
Raman, Anantanarayanan; Charles Sturt University & Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, Orange, NSW, Australia
 
Subject Agro-biodiversity
Margalef’s Diversity Index; Soil Arthropods; Vagile Arthropods; Vitis Ecosystems; Biodiversity
Arthropod biodiversity
 
Description Little work has been done comparing arthropod biodiversity in organically and conventionally managed vineyards in Australia. Hence, we evaluated arthropod biodiversity and abundance in organically and conventionally managed vineyards in Orange Bioregion of New South Wales. Field trials were organized in Tamburlaine, an organically managed vineyard and in Hedberg Hill, a conventionally managed vineyard in spring 2015 and autumn 2016. Abundance and diversity were determined using Margalef’s diversity index. A total of 266,798 arthropods belonging to 11 Orders were recorded in both Tamburlaine and Hedberg Hill vineyards during sampling periods. The Collembola, Hymenoptera, Thysanoptera, and Diptera were the most dominant groups in both vineyards, whereas those belonging to Hemiptera, Neuroptera, Lepidoptera, Orthoptera, Coleoptera, Araneae, and the subphylum Myriapoda were the least. Analysis of abundance of arthropods between spring 2015 and autumn 2016 showed that a significant difference occurred in both vineyards. However, the biodiversity of arthropods sampled in both spring 2015 and autumn 2016 showed no significant difference between the populations obtained from either. Although no difference was evident in terms of biodiversity, significantly higher mean numbers of arthropods in Tamburlaine occurred than in Hedberg Hill. This pilot study shows that the management practice has an effect on arthropod abundance, but not on arthropod diversity. The results achieved offer an insight into the role of management practice on arthropod abundance and biodiversity in vineyards. .
 
Publisher NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ECOLOGY
 
Date 2017-05-25
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://nieindia.org/Journal/index.php/ijees/article/view/1071
 
Source International Journal of Ecology and Environmental Sciences; Vol 43, No 1 (2017); 9-15
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://nieindia.org/Journal/index.php/ijees/article/view/1071/296
 
Coverage Australia
Field study
 
Rights The copyright of the journal vests totally with the NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ECOLOGY.This Journal is registered at the Copyright Clearance Center Inc. (CCC), 222 Rosewood Drive, Suite 910, Danvers, MA 01923, USA. The copyright owner consents that in the U.S.A. copies of the articles may be made for personal or internal use, or the personal or internal use of specific clients, on payment of a fee of US $ 25.00 per article per copy directly to CCC, for copying beyond that permitted by sections 107 or 108 of the US Copyright Law. This consent does not extend to other kinds of copying, such as copying for general distribution, for advertising or promotional purposes, for creating new collective works or for resale. The ONLINE OPEN ACCESS Content of the Journal is only for use of individuals. ANY person or publisher who dowloads the articles and reproduces them in any form- electronic, on a CD/DVD or in print for sale and commercial use shall be prosecuted.
 

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