Solemn Geographies of Human Limits: Drones and the Neocolonial Administration of Life and Death

Affinities: A Journal of Radical Theory, Culture, and Action

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Field Value
 
Title Solemn Geographies of Human Limits: Drones and the Neocolonial Administration of Life and Death
 
Creator Vasko, Timothy Bowers; Johns Hopkins University
 
Subject Political Science
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles; drones; heterotopia; Global South; neocolonialism
 
Description This paper conceptualizes Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and the reconnaissance-strike complexes they are said to make possible through their deployment against supposed “terrorist” threats in the global South, through Foucault’s concept of heterotopias. The spatiotemporal relationships that drones and their reconnaissance-strike complexes constitute, I argue, are indicative of three recent shifts in the process of conceptualizing and confronting security problematics in strategic counterterrorist discourse and practice. These shifts are 1) a shift in the ontological act of Locating Threat; 2) the biopolitical process of Coding Bodies to be Killed; and 3) what I call the Neocolonial Administration of Life and Death. I trace these problems, respectively, through a) The geopolitical imperatives to which drones are said to respond; b) The logic of novel coding technologies and principles upon which threat is calculated; and c) Novel modes of cultural taxonimization of occupied peoples.
 
Publisher Affinities Editorial Board and Publishing Collective
 
Contributor
 
Date 2013-11-21
 
Type Invited Commentary

 
Format application/pdf
text/html
 
Identifier http://journals.sfu.ca/affinities/index.php/affinities/article/view/82
 
Source Affinities: A Journal of Radical Theory, Culture, and Action; Vol 7, No 1 (2013): Violent Encounters from Social Movements to Terrorism
 
Language en
 
Coverage


 
Rights Affinities is anti-copyright. We encourage people to use anything they find here in any way they please -- take risks, contaminate the global mindstream, get themselves in trouble. It's out of our hands (we, the editors, and you, the writer) once it's on the site. That's what it means to 'publish', no?
 

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