IRONY IN CHARLES DICKEN'S OLIVER TWIST

Englisia Journal

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Field Value
 
Title IRONY IN CHARLES DICKEN'S OLIVER TWIST
 
Creator Trisnawati, Ika Kana
Sarair, Sarair
Rahmi, Maulida
 
Subject English Literature
Oliver Twist; verbal irony; situational irony; dramatic irony
 
Description This paper describes the types of irony used by Charles Dickens in his notable early work, Oliver Twist, as well as the reasons the irony was chosen. As a figurative language, irony is utilized to express one’s complex feelings without truly saying them. In Oliver Twist, Dickens brought the readers some real social issues wrapped in dark, deep written expressions of irony uttered by the characters of his novel. Undoubtedly, the novel had left an impact to the British society at the time. The irony Dickens displayed here includes verbal, situational, and dramatic irony. His choice of irony made sense as he intended to criticize the English Poor Laws and to touch the public sentiment. He wanted to let the readers go beyond what was literally written and once they discovered what the truth was, they would eventually understand Dickens’ purposes.
 
Publisher Universitas Islam Negeri Banda Aceh
 
Contributor
 
Date 2016-05-01
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
Peer-reviewed Article
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier http://jurnal.ar-raniry.ac.id/index.php/englisia/article/view/1026
10.22373/ej.v3i2.1026
 
Source Englisia Journal; Vol 3, No 2 (2016); 91-104
Englisia Journal; Vol 3, No 2 (2016); 91-104
2527-6484
2339-2576
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://jurnal.ar-raniry.ac.id/index.php/englisia/article/view/1026/931
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2017 Sarair
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0
 

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