Indigenous and African intellectual labor and the commodities of vast early America

Esboços - Revista do Programa de Pós-Graduação em História da UFSC

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Field Value
 
Title Indigenous and African intellectual labor and the commodities of vast early America

 
Creator Draper, Mary
 
Subject Knowledge
Expertise
Slavery
 
Description This article calls for centering the lives, labor, and expertise of Indigenous, African, and African-descended people in future commodity histories of the colonial Americas. The production of the Atlantic world’s most prized commodities depended upon the expertise and intellectual labor of Indigenous and African people. Their knowledge — which was often violently extracted by Europeans through enslavement — buttressed colonization and enabled the existence of many of the early modern Atlantic world’s commodities. If we recognize this botanical, agricultural, and environmental knowledge as intellectual history, then historians can show how Indigenous and African knowledge anchored the Atlantic world and, by extension, the global economy. At the same time, though, the creation of these commodities resulted in environmental devastation. Though imperial wealth depended upon their labor, Indigenous and African people bore the brunt of environmental collapse in the wake of commodity production. Their livelihoods and homelands were not protected.
  
 
Publisher Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina
 
Date 2021-12-29
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://periodicos.ufsc.br/index.php/esbocos/article/view/83255
10.5007/2175-7976.2021.e83255
 
Source Esboços: histories in global contexts; Vol. 28 No. 49 (2021); 716-727
Esboços: historias en contextos globales; Vol. 28 Núm. 49 (2021); 716-727
Esboços: histórias em contextos globais; v. 28 n. 49 (2021); 716-727
2175-7976
1414-722X
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://periodicos.ufsc.br/index.php/esbocos/article/view/83255/48184
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2021 Mary Draper
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
 

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