Mahasweta Devi and Postmodern Cultural Hegemony

The Achievers Journal: Journal of English Language, Literature and Culture

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Field Value
 
Title Mahasweta Devi and Postmodern Cultural Hegemony
 
Creator Guha, Rajdeep
 
Subject culture; Postmodernism; Hegemony
 
Description The paper outlines a brief overview of Postmodernism and its offshoot Cultural Hegemony. The paper examines closely how Antonio Gramsci developed and propagated Cultural Hegemony. Furthermore, the paper takes into account the factors that influence a state to impose a hegemonic stance on the common people. The scope of the paper also covers Mahasweta Devi, one of the seminal writers of India who has tirelessly championed for the cause of the tribal communities and the downtrodden. Mahasweta Devi has always fought against the hegemonic tools that have been used by the state machinery at the behest of the capitalist class. The paper gives an overview of some of her prominent works that seek to expose the social hypocrisies and prejudices that impede the progress of the subaltern communities.
 
Publisher The Achievers Foundation for English Studies
 
Contributor
 
Date 2021-04-28
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier http://theachieversjournal.org/index.php/taj/article/view/427
 
Source The Achievers Journal: Journal of English Language, Literature and Culture; Vol 7, No 1 (2021): The Achievers Journal; 25-31
2395-0897
2454-2296
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://theachieversjournal.org/index.php/taj/article/view/427/114
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2021 Rajdeep Guha
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
 

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