Bacterial Profile and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Isolates Recovered from Lower Respiratory Tract Infection for Patients in Rizgary Hospital, Erbil

ARO-THE SCIENTIFIC JOURNAL OF KOYA UNIVERSITY

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Field Value
 
Title Bacterial Profile and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Isolates Recovered from Lower Respiratory Tract Infection for Patients in Rizgary Hospital, Erbil
 
Creator Chawsheen, Mahmoud A.
Al-Naqshbandi, Ahmed A.
Abdulqader, Haval H.
 
Subject Acinetobacter baumannii
Ampicillin
Lower respiratory tract infection
Multidrug resistance
Streptococcus parasanguinis
 
Description Recognition of etiologies of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) may help in delivering effective treatment options and circumvent emergence of antibiotic resistance. This study was carried out to uncover bacterial profile and antibiotic sensitivity patterns among 310 LRTI patients attended Rizagary Hospital between January 2014 to December 2016. Standard laboratory techniques were applied in collecting, processing, and culturing sputum and bronchial wash specimens. VITEK® 2 compact systems were used to identify bacteria and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns. Results showed that Streptococcus parasanguinis and Acinetobacter baumannii were the most abundant gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria (GPB & GNB), respectively, isolated from sputum specimens. From bronchial wash specimens, only GNB were detected and Serratia marcescens was the most abundant one. Antibiotic sensitivity tests revealed that Streptococcus parasanguinis was the most resistant GPB and Acinetobacter baumannii was the most resistant GNB. Sputum recovered GPB were highly resistant to Ampicillin, Erythromycin, Levofloxacin, Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole, and Tetracycline. Bronchial wash recovered GNB were highly resistant to Ampicillin, Minocycline, Pefloxacin, Piperacillin, and Ticarcillin. In conclusion, LRTIs are mainly associated with GNB rather than GPB. The recovered Streptococcus parasanguinis and Acinetobacter baumannii were found to be multidrug-resistant pathogens. Ampicillin was ineffective against any of recovered pathogenic bacteria.
 
Publisher Koya University
 
Date 2020-12-07
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
Peer-reviewed article
text
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier http://aro.koyauniversity.org/index.php/aro/article/view/724
10.14500/aro.10724
 
Source ARO-THE SCIENTIFIC JOURNAL OF KOYA UNIVERSITY; Vol. 8 No. 2 (2020): Issue Fifteen; 64-70
2307-549X
2410-9355
 
Language eng
 
Relation http://aro.koyauniversity.org/index.php/aro/article/view/724/191
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2020 Mahmoud A. Chawsheen, Ahmed A. Al-Naqshbandi, Haval H. Abdulqader
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0
 

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