ASSESSMENT OF THE DEMAND FOR BICYCLE PARKING INFRASTRUCTURE IN VIENNA

3rd International Conference on Road and Rail Infrastructure (CETRA 2014)

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Field Value
 
Title ASSESSMENT OF THE DEMAND FOR BICYCLE PARKING INFRASTRUCTURE IN VIENNA
 
Creator Paul Christian Pfaffenbichler; Research Center for Transport Planning and Traffic Engineering, Institute of Transportation, Vienna University of Technology
Tadej Brezina; Research Center for Transport Planning and Traffic Engineering, Institute of Transportation, Vienna University of Technology
Harald Frey; Research Center for Transport Planning and Traffic Engineering, Institute of Transportation, Vienna University of Technology
 
Subject bicycle parking; cycling; future demand; investment costs; Vienna
 
Description One of the official goals of the Viennese transport policy is to increase the share of cycling by more than twofold. Investments into cycling infrastructure are the key to success. Besides cycling paths and lanes the necessary infrastructure also includes safe and secure parking facilities. Appropriate bicycle parking facilities are needed at primary locations (home) as well as secondary locations (work, shopping, leisure, etc.). The Research Center for Transport Planning and Traffic Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, recently carried out two different studies concerning the assessment of the demand for bicycle infrastructure. The aim of the proposed paper is to present the results of these two studies. The starting point is an analysis of the legal framework for on- and off-street bicycle parking in Austria. Existing planning guidelines are compared with international examples from countries and cities with very high shares of cycling. Citywide data about the location of public bicycle stands are analysed. Six case study areas in the city centre, the inner city area, the suburbs and at a main railway station have been defined. Occupation rates of the bicycle stands in these areas have been counted and analysed. A web based survey has been carried out in order to gain data about bicycle parking at private locations (home, workplace). The spatial distribution of the future levels of cycling has been estimated using three different methods. According to the results of our research a total of about 44,000 to 56,000 additional public bicycle stands are needed to accommodate the intended increase in cycling. The highest demand has been identified for the central business district and the districts number 3 and 10, the lowest for the districts number 8, 6 and 5. The investment costs have been estimated with roughly 16 million Euros.
 
Publisher CETRA 2014
 
Contributor Wiener Umweltanwaltschaft, Wien 3420 AG
 
Date 2017-02-28 16:38:01
 
Type Peer-reviewed Paper
 
Identifier http://master.grad.hr/cetra/ocs/index.php/cetra3/cetra2014/paper/view/270
 
Source CETRA 2014; 3rd International Conference on Road and Rail Infrastructure
 
Language en
 
Rights <p>Authors who submit to this conference agree to the following terms:<br /> <strong>a)</strong> Authors retain copyright over their work, while allowing the conference to place this unpublished work under a <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creative Commons Attribution License</a>, which allows others to freely access, use, and share the work, with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and its initial presentation at this conference. <br /> <strong>b)</strong> Submitted full papers will be published in the book of proceedings "Road and Rail Infrastructure II" as well as in digital form (on a CD). Conference organiser is allowed to publish author's names, institution and country as well as the paper abstract on the conference web site.</p>
 

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