Effect of Moisture Content and Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Bearing Capacity of RAP/Natural Aggregate Mixtures

4th International Conference on Road and Rail Infrastructure (CETRA 2016)

View Publication Info
 
 
Field Value
 
Title Effect of Moisture Content and Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Bearing Capacity of RAP/Natural Aggregate Mixtures
 
Creator Josipa Domitrovic; University of Zagreb Faculty of Civil Engineering Department for Transportation
Tatjana Rukavina; University of Zagreb Faculty of Civil Engineering Department for Transportation
Sanja Dimter; Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek Faculty of Civil Engineering
 
Subject unbound granular layer; bearing capacity; reclaimed asphalt pavement; moisture content; freeze-thaw cycling
 
Description Unbound granular base layer plays a significant role in the overall performance of the pavement structure. It provides structural support for the upper pavement layers, contributes to load distribution and acts as frost protection layer. Traditionally this layer is built with high quality natural aggregate. However, as the sources of natural aggregates are becoming increasingly scarce, engineers are examining the possibilities of using recycled materials. The most widely used recycled material in pavement construction is reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and its possible application in unbound granular base layer has been investigated since the mid-1990s. Previous studies confirmed that RAP can be a suitable replacement for natural aggregate, but there is major concern regarding the impact of seasonal variations in environmental factors on its properties. The paper analyses effect of changing moisture conditions and freeze-thaw cycling on bearing capacity of natural aggregate (limestone and gravel) and its mixtures with varying RAP percentages (20, 35 and 50%). Bearing capacity was determinate by laboratory CBR tests on samples prepared by modified Proctor compaction at optimal moisture content. Three samples for each mixture were prepared and tested after different curing conditions. First sample was tested immediately after compaction, second after 96 hours soaking in water and third after 14 freeze-thaw cycles. Base on the obtained results it can be concluded that the impact of changes in moisture content and freeze-thaw cycling is largely depended on the type of natural aggregate. Increasing RAP content for mixtures with limestone decreases their sensitivity to changes in moisture content and freeze-thaw cycling. For mixtures with gravel increasing RAP content increases their sensitivity to changes in moisture content and does not affect their sensitivity to freeze-thaw cycling.
 
Publisher CETRA 2016
 
Contributor
 
Date 2017-02-28 15:11:35
 
Type Peer-reviewed Paper
 
Identifier http://master.grad.hr/cetra/ocs/index.php/cetra4/cetra2016/paper/view/476
 
Source CETRA 2016; 4th International Conference on Road and Rail Infrastructure
 
Language en
 
Rights Authors who submit to this conference agree to the following terms:<br /> <strong>a)</strong> Authors retain copyright over their work, while allowing the conference to place this unpublished work under a <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creative Commons Attribution License</a>, which allows others to freely access, use, and share the work, with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and its initial presentation at this conference. <br /> <strong>b)</strong> Submitted full papers will be published in the book of proceedings "Road and Rail Infrastructure IV" as well as in digital form (on a CD). Conference organiser is allowed to publish author's names, institution and country as well as the paper abstract on the conference web site.
 

Contact Us

The PKP Index is an initiative of the Public Knowledge Project.

For PKP Publishing Services please use the PKP|PS contact form.

For support with PKP software we encourage users to consult our wiki for documentation and search our support forums.

For any other correspondence feel free to contact us using the PKP contact form.

Find Us

Twitter

Copyright © 2015-2018 Simon Fraser University Library