SUBMICROSCOPIC CHANGES OF STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS OF THE SPLEEN DUE TO THE ACTION OF MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE

International Academy Journal Web of Scholar

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Title SUBMICROSCOPIC CHANGES OF STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS OF THE SPLEEN DUE TO THE ACTION OF MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE
SUBMICROSCOPIC CHANGES OF STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS OF THE SPLEEN DUE TO THE ACTION OF MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE
 
Creator Harapko, Tetiana
Mateshuk-Vatseba, Lesia
 
Subject spleen
rat
lymphocytes
macrophages
monosodium glutamate
exposure
spleen
rat
lymphocytes
macrophages
monosodium glutamate
exposure
 
Description The results of an experimental study conducted on white male rats and females of reproductive age were analyzed in order to detect submicroscopic changes in the structural components of the spleen under the action of monosodium glutamate in the dynamics. For two, four, six and eight weeks, the animals received monosodium glutamate at a dose of 0.07 g / kg body weight daily with food. Sections of the spleen were made on a UMTP-6M ultramicrotome with a diamond knife (DIATOM) and double contrast was performed according to Reynolds and uranyl acetate. Submicroscopic examinations of the organ were performed using an electron transmission microscope TEM-100. The investigated material was photodocuted using a SONY – H9 digital camera. The first violations of the structural components of the spleen are observed after two weeks, namely the expansion of intercellular spaces in both white and red pulp of the spleen, which contain vacuole-like structures, an increase in plasma cells, the cytoplasm of which is filled with dilated tubules. In dynamics with increase in duration of reception changes deepen, reaching a maximum in 8 weeks of experiment. Electron microscopy revealed that the signs of adaptive-compensatory processes by the end of the experiment lead to a loss of regenerative function.
The results of an experimental study conducted on white male rats and females of reproductive age were analyzed in order to detect submicroscopic changes in the structural components of the spleen under the action of monosodium glutamate in the dynamics. For two, four, six and eight weeks, the animals received monosodium glutamate at a dose of 0.07 g / kg body weight daily with food. Sections of the spleen were made on a UMTP-6M ultramicrotome with a diamond knife (DIATOM) and double contrast was performed according to Reynolds and uranyl acetate. Submicroscopic examinations of the organ were performed using an electron transmission microscope TEM-100. The investigated material was photodocuted using a SONY – H9 digital camera. The first violations of the structural components of the spleen are observed after two weeks, namely the expansion of intercellular spaces in both white and red pulp of the spleen, which contain vacuole-like structures, an increase in plasma cells, the cytoplasm of which is filled with dilated tubules. In dynamics with increase in duration of reception changes deepen, reaching a maximum in 8 weeks of experiment. Electron microscopy revealed that the signs of adaptive-compensatory processes by the end of the experiment lead to a loss of regenerative function.
 
Publisher RS Global Sp. z O.O.
 
Date 2020-06-30
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://rsglobal.pl/index.php/wos/article/view/1257
10.31435/rsglobal_wos/30062020/7126
 
Source International Academy Journal Web of Scholar; No 6(48) (2020): International Academy Journal Web of Scholar; 10-16
International Academy Journal Web of Scholar; № 6(48) (2020): International Academy Journal Web of Scholar; 10-16
2518-1688
2518-167X
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://rsglobal.pl/index.php/wos/article/view/1257/1332
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2020 Tetiana Harapko, Lesia Mateshuk-Vatseba
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
 

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