Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs) Using Somatostatin Analogs: Current View, Clinical Achievements and Future Perspectives

Indonesian Journal of Cancer Chemoprevention

View Publication Info
 
 
Field Value
 
Title Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs) Using Somatostatin Analogs: Current View, Clinical Achievements and Future Perspectives
 
Creator Wongso, Hendris
 
Description Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), previously known as carcinoid tumors, are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms which originate from cells of the endocrine or nervous system with an overall incidence of 1–5 cases per 100,000 individuals per year. Recent studies showed that their incidence has dramatically increased worldwide over the last few years. The majority of NETs overexpress the somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) in tumor cells which are further being used as the important targets for therapy purposes using somatostatin analogs (SSAs) such as octreotide and lanreotide. Like native somatostatin, SSAs bind to SSTRs and induce a range of cellular effects, including antitumor activity. Antitumor activity of SSAs and their high binding properties for the SSTRs have become valuable tools for developing advanced treatment of NETs. Consequently, SSAs have been used widely in routine clinical practice, especially for treatment of various types of NETs. Despite treatment using SSAs have made a positive contribution, recent development suggests that the used of SSAs in combination with chemotherapy or peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) can improve clinical outcome in patients with NETs. This review provides an overview of recent trend in the treatment of NETs using SSAs, their clinical achievements in the last few years and their potential applications in the future.Keywords: neuroendocrine tumors, treatment, somatostatin analogs, chemotherapy, PRRTNeuroendocrine tumors (NETs), previously known as carcinoid tumors, are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms which originate from cells of the endocrine or nervous system with an overall incidence of 1–5 cases per 100,000 individuals per year. Recent studies showed that their incidence has dramatically increased worldwide over the last few years. The majority of NETs overexpress the somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) in tumor cells which are further being used as the important targets for therapy purposes using somatostatin analogs (SSAs) such as octreotide and lanreotide. Like native somatostatin, SSAs bind to SSTRs and induce a range of cellular effects, including antitumor activity. Antitumor activity of SSAs and their high binding properties for the SSTRs have become valuable tools for developing advanced treatment of NETs. Consequently, SSAs have been used widely in routine clinical practice, especially for treatment of various types of NETs. Despite treatment using SSAs have made a positive contribution, recent development suggests that the used of SSAs in combination with chemotherapy or peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) can improve clinical outcome in patients with NETs. This review provides an overview of recent trend in the treatment of NETs using SSAs, their clinical achievements in the last few years and their potential applications in the future.Keywords: neuroendocrine tumors, treatment, somatostatin analogs, chemotherapy, PRRT
 
Publisher Indonesian Society for Cancer Chemoprevention
 
Contributor National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Bandung, Indonesia
 
Date 2019-07-09
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

 
Format application/pdf
 
Identifier https://ijcc.chemoprev.org/index.php/ijcc/article/view/284
10.14499/indonesianjcanchemoprev10iss2pp101-113
 
Source Indonesian Journal of Cancer Chemoprevention; Vol 10, No 2 (2019); 101-113
2355-8989
2088-0197
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://ijcc.chemoprev.org/index.php/ijcc/article/view/284/188
 
Rights Copyright (c) 2019 Hendris Wongso
 

Contact Us

The PKP Index is an initiative of the Public Knowledge Project.

For PKP Publishing Services please use the PKP|PS contact form.

For support with PKP software we encourage users to consult our wiki for documentation and search our support forums.

For any other correspondence feel free to contact us using the PKP contact form.

Find Us

Twitter

Copyright © 2015-2018 Simon Fraser University Library